Investigating the Impact of Environmental Poverty on Criminal Behavior of Young People in Marginal Areas

Document Type: Original Article

Author

Department of Humanistic Sciences, Khomenishhar Branch, Islamic Azad University, Khomeinishahr, Isfahan, Iran

Abstract

This study was examined to investigate the impact of environmental poverty on the criminal behavior of young people in marginal areas. The population of this study included all the youths in the marginalized schools of Isfahan. Sampling was done randomly. The sample size includes 358 students in marginalized areas. For youth with high PC, significant factors included high levels of attitudes toward agreements and conditions, motivation of treatment, perseverance, and bonding to school/work, as well as low levels of risk in peer relations and education/employment. For youth with limited PC, buffering factors with the strongest effects include self-control and future orientation in school or work. Implications of practice and future research were discussed too.

Keywords


Antilla A., Uusitalo, A. (2015). Contemporary marginalization and exclusion of young people – whose reality counts? Noura Publications, 10 (2) 30-40.

2. Bhalla, A., Lapeyre F. (1997). Development and change, 28 (1) 413-433.

3. Burton, M., Kagan C. (2013). Marginalization. Community Psychology: In pursuit of wellness and liberation, London: MacMillan.

4. Cornish, S. (2017). Globalization and marginalization: Discussion guide to the Jesuit Task Force Report. Australia: Loyola Institute.

5. Dalton, J. H., Elias M. J., Wandersman. A. (2011).  Community psychology: Linking individuals and communities. Stamford CT: Wadsworth.

6. Farber, B.A., Azar S. T. (1999). American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 2 (1), 515-528.

7.Omidvar, R., Richmond T. (2003). Immigrant settlement and social inclusion in Canada, Working Paper Series: Perspectives on Social Inclusion, Laidlaw Foundation.

8. Pastore,  F. (2017). Marginalization of young people in education and work: Findings from the school-to-work transition surveys, Education for All Global Monitoring Report, 2(1), 3-8.

9. Peace, R. (2001). Social Policy, Journal of New Zealand, 16 (1) 26-36.

10. Psacharopoulos, G. (2007). The costs as a result of school failure. European Expert Network of Economics, 7 (2), 25-35.

11. Ryan, W.  (2016). Blaming the victim. New York: Vintage.

 

 

 

 

Antilla A., Uusitalo, A. (2015). Contemporary marginalization and exclusion of young people – whose reality counts? Noura Publications, 10 (2) 30-40.

2. Bhalla, A., Lapeyre F. (1997). Development and change, 28 (1) 413-433.

3. Burton, M., Kagan C. (2013). Marginalization. Community Psychology: In pursuit of wellness and liberation, London: MacMillan.

4. Cornish, S. (2017). Globalization and marginalization: Discussion guide to the Jesuit Task Force Report. Australia: Loyola Institute.

5. Dalton, J. H., Elias M. J., Wandersman. A. (2011).  Community psychology: Linking individuals and communities. Stamford CT: Wadsworth.

6. Farber, B.A., Azar S. T. (1999). American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 2 (1), 515-528.

7.Omidvar, R., Richmond T. (2003). Immigrant settlement and social inclusion in Canada, Working Paper Series: Perspectives on Social Inclusion, Laidlaw Foundation.

8. Pastore,  F. (2017). Marginalization of young people in education and work: Findings from the school-to-work transition surveys, Education for All Global Monitoring Report, 2(1), 3-8.

9. Peace, R. (2001). Social Policy, Journal of New Zealand, 16 (1) 26-36.

10. Psacharopoulos, G. (2007). The costs as a result of school failure. European Expert Network of Economics, 7 (2), 25-35.

11. Ryan, W.  (2016). Blaming the victim. New York: Vintage